Displaying episodes 1 - 30 of 68 in total

Eliminating Poverty is a Multifaceted and Evolving Challenge

Seeing China’s recent declaration that it has eliminated extreme poverty, James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss the feasibility of eliminating poverty through central government action (01:28) and the challenges modern societies face in building sustainable systems as our technological and social environments continue to evolve (22:17).

Expecting More, but not too Much, From Science

Recognizing the role scientific advancement can play in making our world a better place, James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss Boris Johnson’s bold plan to outlaw gasoline vehicles in the U.K. by 2030 as part of a “green industrial revolution” (01:27) and take a look at some implications from recent advancements in producing lab created diamonds (20:22). The guys also weigh in on the age-old debate on whether scientific advancement could ever render religion obsolete (32:08).

Democracy is Unquestionably the Objective for our Elections

Seeing the ongoing, unsubstantiated attacks on selective aspects of the 2020 election as a threat to the democratic process, James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss how democratic systems can only function if the vast majority of a populace is willing to buy into democratic norms (02:00) and consider what responsibility elected leaders and news media have in the presence of misinformation and unsubstantiated claims about elections (15:08). The guys also take a look at a recent study into how sleep affects is needed to perform (48:22)

The Process is Messy, but Americans Have Made a Clear Statement

The 2020 U.S. Election included record levels of participation and a collective decision to make a change at the top, and James Keys, Tunde Ogunlana, and Rick Ellsley discuss what the election results reveal about the mindset of Americans (01:57), the messiness of democratic elections (18:13), and what circumstances or trends we need to keep our eyes on moving forward (31:32).

Let’s Fight the Virus and Not the Scientists

COVID-19 rates are spiking across the globe, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana consider whether our societies have misjudged how pervasive the pandemic would be (01:13) and discuss comments from a conservative party leader in the UK about Boris Johnson "giving in to scientific advisers" with his lockdown measures (09:14). The guys also take a look at the apparent availability of cloned pets and some implications of technology’s advance on that front (33:56).

Borat 2 and Our Uncomfortable Reflection

Sacha Baron Cohen’s Borat Subsequent Moviefilm reveals a lot about our society’s values, or its lack thereof, and James Keys, Tunde Ogunlana, and Rob Richardson take a look at various causes and effects of what we see (01:10) and consider what would be needed to get things on track (28:40).

Plans are Good - but Politicians Will Play Politics

The story surrounding Ice Cube’s Contract with Black America was hijacked by politicians, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana take a look at the Cube’s approach to getting it on the table and the public fallout, reasons why this type of action continues to be necessary, and the extent to which Black Americans may be taken for granted by America’s main political parties.

Voting - as a Collective Act - Provides Coherence

The lifeblood of our system of government is voting, so James Keys, Tunde Ogunlana, and friend of the program Rick Ellsley discuss why voting matters in our governmental system (01:35), what they make of the aversion many Americans have to everyone (including themselves) voting (11:23), the specific challenges being faced in 2020 (27:18), and what it would take for more Americans to come together as far as wanting everyone (including themselves) to vote (44:56).

Culture Series: The Alchemist, a book by Paulo Coelho

Paulo Coelho's international bestselling book, "The Alchemist," is a timeless story about self discovery, destiny, travel and treasure, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss their impressions of and takeaways from some of the major themes in the story. Note that this podcast does contain spoilers.

Taxpayers are also Paying Price for Police Misconduct

The financial settlements paid by cities following police misconduct are undoubtedly a red flag, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss the implications of the $12 million settlement paid by Louisville to the family of Breonna Taylor (01:05). The guys also compare discuss the commonality between America’s original conspiracy theory and conspiracy theories floating around today (26:56) and the disturbing story about mass hysterectomies being performed in ICE facilities (34:50).

Streaming Between the Lines: Capital in the Twenty-First Century

The “Capital in the Twenty-First Century” documentary provided a fasted paced and fascinating look at the evolution of capital in recent history and how this has affected so much, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss what stood out the most (01:27), what can be made of growing inequality trends (17:05), the link between wealth inequality and social instability (30:04), and how current trends can be addressed (43:12).

Throwing Stones Into Our Glass House

Our society’s recklessness and disregard seems to be making the Earth less hospitable to our society, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana take a look at the accelerating destruction of, and increasing threats to, our habitat (01:21) and discuss ways that societies can make preserving the planet we live on more of a priority (32:55).

Our Economic Downturn is Being Felt in Expected and Unexpected Ways

With the coronavirus driven economic downturn still creating so much uncertainty, James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss reports that are suggesting that the worst of the economic fallout is still to come (01:04). The guys also make sense of the fact that more young adults under 30 are living with their parents than on their own (28:49).

Judging Actors and not Actions Corrupts Judgment

It often seems that what happens means less to many people than who it happens to, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss how public polarization outpaced investigation with the shooting of Jacob Blake (01:44) and some of the positive and negative things we have seen in the aftermath of the tragedy (16:07). The guys also try to make sense of the reports that our intelligence services will be restricting the information provided to Congress about ongoing threats to disrupt the 2020 election (38:43).

Manipulation Through Espionage and Information Warfare

Our intelligence community is sounding the alarm, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana react to the release of the final volume of the Senate Intel Committee’s Bipartisan Russia Report (01:08), discuss the ongoing information warfare campaign being waged against Americans and the “Firehose of Falsehood” propaganda model as explained by the RAND Corporation (09:24), and speak on the 100 anniversary the 19th Amendment which prohibited gender based voting restrictions (50:12).

Undermining the USPS From Within is American Self Sabotage

The push to defund the U.S. Postal Service is needlessly self-destructive, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss their issues with the efforts to politicize the operations of the U.S. Postal Service (01:24). The guys also consider the extent to which the coronavirus has killed the free market (24:34) and discuss a recent discovery of a (literal) caveman’s bed from 200,000 years ago (44:50).

Chess Moves for Control over Your Sensitive Data

Governments and large companies around the world are making high stakes, chess style moves over control of who has access to your sensitive data, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss the President’s executive order that seeks to ban TikTok in the U.S. (01:20) and the discomfort some have expressed following Blackstone’s acquisition of genealogy company Ancestry (21:14). The guys also discuss their takeaways from recent findings on how dogs process and understand human language (35:11).

(Medical) Truth in the Eyes of the Beholder

The “truth” about the coronavirus seems to vary depending on who you talk to, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana react to the apparent post truth nature of medicine (02:04), discuss why conspiracy theories and fanciful explanations for things seem to have so much appeal (18:09), and consider whether the widespread lack of any shared understanding of truth is a substantial threat to our democratic society (39:00).

Culture Series: Talking to Strangers, a Book by Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell’s Talking to Strangers laid out several concepts that influence how we deal with people we do not know, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss which of the concepts was most notable (02:25), which anecdotes from the book stood out (22:32), biases and trends that were present in several of the concepts (38:37) and whether the book gives us more or less faith in humanity’s ability to solve its problems (45:45).

Avoiding Chronic Stress when Stressors are All Around Us

We all encounter stressors and potential stressors all day long, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana take a look at what appears to be causing the most stress during the COVID-19 crisis (01:29), the nature of chronic stress and how it effects our bodies (06:44), and some of the things they do to manage stress (22:18). The guys also discuss the shift in the zodiac signs published by NASA and how the meaning one personally assigns to that make that shift something stressful (34:55).

The Fight Against Hate Can and Should be Broad

The intersection of ideology, race, and religion is always going to be difficult to navigate, but James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss the Anti-Semitic social media posts by NFL player DeSean Jackson, how he handled the resulting controversy so far, and the various societal factors that have come into play (01:11). The guys also consider how Black people who disagree with the comments should be responding (22:28) and how the topics of race and religion can make issues like this more difficult to discuss (39:05).

Removing the Confederacy from Positions of Honor

We have seen efforts to remove Confederate items from places of honor pick up in recent times, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss the armed protest of a Confederate monument in Georgia on July 4th (01:24), including whether the images of armed protestors could be used to undermine the message of the protestors (17:10). The guys also discuss whether naked appeals to a “Confederate heritage” can still be politically viable in the U.S. (24:52) and the apparent attempts to reduce the issue to a partisan one (29:56).

Mask Aversion and the Lizard Brain

The wearing of masks has surprisingly become a hot button issue, arousing a surprising level of passion in some circles, so James Keys, Tunde Ogunlana, and Rick Ellsley discuss what may be driving some people’s aversion to masks as well as the emotion and the level of commitment they bring to the argument (01:46) and the extent to which politics and polarization has infected people’s view of the wearing of masks (26:21).

Streaming Between the Lines: Bombshell

“Bombshell” was in large part about of the women who exposed the culture of sexual harassment at Fox News, but it also showed an approach to making news media profitable, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss the sexualizing of aspects of news presentation (01:46), the selection and presentation of news to play on emotion (18:07) and confirmation bias (34:43) in order to target specific types of viewers and obtain unquestioned loyalty from those viewers. The guys also take a look at how different people respond to the type of accusations dealt with in the movie, particularly in situations involving conduct that is not egregious as the stuff that was happening at Fox News (44:54).

It’s a Fight to Make Voting More Accessible

The right to vote has been in large part secured, but the fight against efforts to make it inaccessible is ongoing, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana take a look at the issues Georgia primary and how the practice of voter suppression often plays out (02:00), discuss the typical battle lines in the fight to make voting more or less accessible, including LeBron James’ recent entry into the fray (26:23), and how these battle lines influence, and are influenced by, the strategies of the Republican and Democratic parties (39:49).

With Lots of People, There’s a Lot of Power

Americans coming together in such large numbers is a reassertion of the ultimate power of the people, so James Keys, Tunde Ogunlana, and Carlton Washington discuss what change is being sought, and what change should be sought, by the people (01:34), the defund the police theme that has picked up steam in recent weeks (12:15), how some public figures and institutions have publicly (and apparently genuinely) changed their tune on the urgency of fighting for justice and equality (30:26), and what appears to be a massive turn away from divisiveness and towards coming together to address societal issues (43:20).

No More Compromises on Equality

The murder of George Floyd has been a flashpoint for civil unrest around the U.S., and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana take a look at the actual murder and how people will be given opportunities to perceive it however they would like (01:19), the protests and the frustration which fuels them and the commonality that binds together all of the peaceful protestors (07:57), taking a specific look at the peaceful protestors really embody the equality ideology (15:30). The guys also discuss the looting and violence that has popped up as well as the militarized approach to the demonstrations (33:15) and consider what comes next (47:23).

At the Crossroads of Economic Recession and Recovery

Our current economic situation seems dire, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana take a look at what experts are saying is in store for our economy, including whether we are in position to have a quick recovery (01:42) or experience an extended depression (09:32) and if anything can be done to get things back on track more quickly (19:05). The guys also discuss a coal power plant’s plan billion dollar bet to stay viable by building the largest carbon capture facility ever (41:02).

Law and Order v Power and Privilege

No one man should have all that power, so James Keys, Tunde Ogunlana, and Carlton Washington take a look at the use of power and privilege to undermine the rule of law, particularly taking a look at the murder of Ahmaud Arbery and the failure to arrest the killers (01:54) and the armed protests of COVID lockdown and whether use of intimidation tactics are justified (21:05). The guys also discuss what Attorney General William Barr is attempting to do in trying to let off Michael Flynn after Flynn admitted to lying to federal agents and whether President Obama is correct that rule of law is at risk due to Barr’s conduct (37:28).

Culture Series: Part 2 of Confessions of an Economic Hit Man

Continuing their look at Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss how the described corporatocracy system and economic hit man activity undeniably did provide some benefits to Americans (02:22). The guys also consider whether a having corporatocracy with economic hit men is inconsistent with the foundational values of the America republic (11:16), whether economic imperialism is inevitable (23:32), and the extent to which our human nature makes varying economic systems ripe for exploitation and/or unworkable (37:28).